Gang-Related Legislation by State Index

Oregon

Curfew (view all states for this subject)

Oregon § 419C.680. Hours When Minors Prohibited From Public Places; Exception; Duties of Parents or Guardians; Local Regulations; Violations

(1) No minor shall be in or upon any street, highway, park, alley or other public place between the hours of 12 midnight and 4 a.m. of the following morning, unless:

(a) Such minor is accompanied by a parent, guardian or other person 18 years of age or over and authorized by the parent or by law to have care and custody of the minor;

(b) Such minor is then engaged in a lawful pursuit or activity which requires the presence of the minor in such public places during the hours specified in this section; or

(c) The minor is emancipated pursuant to ORS 419B.550 to 419B.558.

(2) No parent, guardian or person having the care and custody of a minor under the age of 18 years shall allow such minor to be in or upon any street, highway, park, alley or other public place between the hours specified in subsection (1) of this section, except as otherwise provided in that subsection.

(3) Subsections (1) and (2) of this section do not affect the authority of any political subdivision to make regulations concerning the conduct of minors in public places by ordinance or other local law, provided, that the local ordinance or law restricts curfew hours at least to the extent required by subsections (1) and (2) of this section.

(4) The county court or board of county commissioners of any county may provide by ordinance for a curfew restriction on minors applicable to areas not within a city, which has the same terms provided in subsection (1) of this section except that the period of curfew may include hours in addition to those specified in subsection (1) of this section. The ordinance may provide different periods of curfew for different age groups.

(5) Any minor who violates subsection (1) of this section or an ordinance established under subsection (4) of this section may be taken into custody as provided in ORS 419C.080, 419C.085 and 419C.088 and may be subjected to further proceedings as provided in this chapter.

Drive-By Shooting (view all states for this subject)

Oregon § 163.707. Forfeiture of Motor Vehicle Used in Drive-By Shooting

(1) A motor vehicle used by the owner in a drive-by shooting is subject to civil in rem forfeiture.

(2) Seizure and forfeiture proceedings under this section shall be conducted in accordance with Chapter 475A.

(3) As used in this section, "drive-by shooting" means discharge of a firearm from a motor vehicle while committing or attempting to commit:

(a) Aggravated murder under Section 163.095;

(b) Murder under Section 163.115;

(c) Manslaughter in any degree under Section 163.118 or 163.125;

(d) Assault in any degree under Section 163.160, 163.165, 163.175, or 163.185;

(e) Menacing under Section 163.190;

(f) Recklessly endangering another person under Section 163.195;

(g) Assaulting a public safety officer under Section 163.208; or

(h) Intimidation in any degree under Section 166.155 or 166.165.

Oregon § 166.220. Unlawful Use of Weapon

(1) A person commits the crime of unlawful use of a weapon if the person:

(a) Attempts to use unlawfully against another, or carries or possesses with intent to use unlawfully against another, any dangerous or deadly weapon as defined in ORS 161.015; or

(b) Intentionally discharges a firearm, blowgun, bow and arrow, crossbow or explosive device within the city limits of any city or within residential areas within urban growth boundaries at or in the direction of any person, building, structure or vehicle within the range of the weapon without having legal authority for such discharge.

(2) This section does not apply to:

(a) Police officers or military personnel in the lawful performance of their official duties;

(b) Persons lawfully defending life or property as provided in ORS 161.219;

(c) Persons discharging firearms, blowguns, bows and arrows, crossbows or explosive devices upon public or private shooting ranges, shooting galleries or other areas designated and built for the purpose of target shooting;

(d) Persons lawfully engaged in hunting in compliance with rules and regulations adopted by the State Department of Fish and Wildlife; or

(e) An employee of the United States Department of Agriculture, acting within the scope of employment, discharging a firearm in the course of the lawful taking of wildlife.

(3) Unlawful use of a weapon is a Class C felony.

Gang Prevention (view all states for this subject)

Oregon § 21. Youth Development Council [Effective Until March 15, 2016]

(1) The Youth Development Council is established. The council shall function under the direction and control of the Oregon Education Investment Board established by section 1, chapter 519, Oregon Laws 2011.

(2) The council is established for the purpose of assisting the board in overseeing a unified system that provides services to school-age children through youth 20 years of age in a manner that supports academic success, reduces criminal involvement and is integrated, measurable and accountable. The council shall provide direction to the Youth Development Division.

(3) The council consists of no fewer than 15 members who are appointed by the Governor. The Governor shall ensure that membership of the council satisfies any federal requirements for membership of a state advisory committee on juvenile justice.

(4) The council shall:

(a) Determine the availability of funding to support community-based youth development programs, services and initiatives with demonstrated outcomes and strategic objectives established by the council by rule.

(b) Prioritize funding for services related to:

(A) The prevention of and intervention in the risk factors that lead to juvenile delinquency and the promotion of protective factors that improve the health and well-being of children and youth, as supported by evidence-based program models and other research-based models; and

(B) The prevention of and intervention in gang violence and gang involvement.

(5) The council may:

(a) Enter into performance-based intergovernmental agreements with regional and county entities, and tribal governments, to contract for the provision of youth development programs, services and initiatives that will achieve demonstrated outcomes and strategic objectives established by the council by rule.

(b) Determine the means by which services to children and youth may be provided effectively and efficiently across multiple programs to improve the academic and social outcomes of children and youth.

(c) Assess state programs and services related to youth development and training, and identify methods by which programs and services may be coordinated or consolidated.
(d) Establish common academic and social indicators to support attainment of goals established by the board.

(e) Establish common program outcome measurements and coordinate data collection across multiple programs and services.

(f) Ensure implementation of best practices that:

(A) Are evidence based;

(B) Are culturally, gender and age appropriate;

(C) Address individual risk factors;

(D) Build upon factors that improve the health and well-being of children and youth; and

(E) Include tribal best practices.

(5) The Governor may designate one member of the council to serve as the chairperson or, if the Governor chooses not to designate a chairperson, the council may elect one of its members to serve as chairperson.

(6) In accordance with applicable provisions of ORS chapter 183, the council may adopt rules necessary for the administration of the laws that the council is charged with administering.

Oregon § 26. Report Establishing Funding Priorities for Gang Violence Intervention Efforts and Programs

By November 1, 2013, the Youth Development Council shall submit a report to the Oregon Education Investment Board that establishes funding priorities for gang violence intervention efforts and programs that assist gang-affected youth.

Oregon § 336.109. Policy to Reduce Gang Involvement, Violent Activities, and Drug Abuse

(1) After consultation with appropriate agencies and officials, including the Department of Education, each school district is encouraged to develop and adopt a comprehensive policy to reduce gang involvement, violent activities, and drug abuse by public school students in the school district, including but not limited to:

(a) A statement that evaluates:

(A) The nature and extent of gang involvement, violent activities, and drug abuse by public school students of the school district and (B) The impact of gang involvement, violent activities, and drug abuse on the ability of public schools in the school district to meet curriculum requirements and improve the attendance of public school students.

(b) A statement that emphasizes the need to reduce gang involvement, violent activities, and drug abuse by public school students.

(c) Strategies to reduce gang involvement, violent activities, and drug abuse by students of the school district considering the needs of the public school students.

(d) Methods to communicate conflict resolution skills to the teachers and public school students of the school district.

(e) Strategies to inform the teachers of the school district, the parents of public school students, and the public about the policy the school district developed pursuant to this section.

(2) As used in this section, "gang" means a group that identifies itself through the use of a name; unique appearance or language, including hand signs; the claiming of geographical territory; or the espousing of a distinctive belief system that frequently results in criminal activity.

Gang-Related Definitions (view all states for this subject)

Oregon § 164.381. Definitions

As used in Sections 137.131, 164.381 to 164.386, and 419C.461:

(1) "Graffiti" means any inscriptions, words, figures, or designs that are marked, etched, scratched, drawn, painted, pasted, or otherwise affixed to the surface of property.

(2) "Graffiti implement" means paint, ink, chalk, dye, or other substance or any instrument or article designed or adapted for spraying, marking, etching, scratching, or carving surfaces.

Oregon § 336.109. Policy to Reduce Gang Involvement, Violent Activities, and Drug Abuse

(1) After consultation with appropriate agencies and officials, including the Department of Education, each school district is encouraged to develop and adopt a comprehensive policy to reduce gang involvement, violent activities, and drug abuse by public school students in the school district, including but not limited to:

(a) A statement that evaluates:

(A) The nature and extent of gang involvement, violent activities, and drug abuse by public school students of the school district and (B) The impact of gang involvement, violent activities, and drug abuse on the ability of public schools in the school district to meet curriculum requirements and improve the attendance of public school students.

(b) A statement that emphasizes the need to reduce gang involvement, violent activities, and drug abuse by public school students.

(c) Strategies to reduce gang involvement, violent activities, and drug abuse by students of the school district considering the needs of the public school students.

(d) Methods to communicate conflict resolution skills to the teachers and public school students of the school district.

(e) Strategies to inform the teachers of the school district, the parents of public school students, and the public about the policy the school district developed pursuant to this section.

(2) As used in this section, "gang" means a group that identifies itself through the use of a name; unique appearance or language, including hand signs; the claiming of geographical territory; or the espousing of a distinctive belief system that frequently results in criminal activity.

Gang-Related Funding (view all states for this subject)

Oregon § 26. Report Establishing Funding Priorities for Gang Violence Intervention Efforts and Programs

By November 1, 2013, the Youth Development Council shall submit a report to the Oregon Education Investment Board that establishes funding priorities for gang violence intervention efforts and programs that assist gang-affected youth.

Gangs and Schools (view all states for this subject)

Oregon § 336.109. Policy to Reduce Gang Involvement, Violent Activities, and Drug Abuse

(1) After consultation with appropriate agencies and officials, including the Department of Education, each school district is encouraged to develop and adopt a comprehensive policy to reduce gang involvement, violent activities, and drug abuse by public school students in the school district, including but not limited to:

(a) A statement that evaluates:

(A) The nature and extent of gang involvement, violent activities, and drug abuse by public school students of the school district and (B) The impact of gang involvement, violent activities, and drug abuse on the ability of public schools in the school district to meet curriculum requirements and improve the attendance of public school students.

(b) A statement that emphasizes the need to reduce gang involvement, violent activities, and drug abuse by public school students.

(c) Strategies to reduce gang involvement, violent activities, and drug abuse by students of the school district considering the needs of the public school students.

(d) Methods to communicate conflict resolution skills to the teachers and public school students of the school district.

(e) Strategies to inform the teachers of the school district, the parents of public school students, and the public about the policy the school district developed pursuant to this section.

(2) As used in this section, "gang" means a group that identifies itself through the use of a name; unique appearance or language, including hand signs; the claiming of geographical territory; or the espousing of a distinctive belief system that frequently results in criminal activity.

Graffiti (view all states for this subject)

Oregon § 137.131. Community Service for Offense Involving Graffiti

(1) The court shall impose community service as a condition of a probation sentence when a person is convicted of criminal mischief and the conduct engaged in consists of defacing property by creating graffiti unless the sentence includes incarceration in a county jail or a state correctional institution.

(2) The community service must include removing graffiti, either those that the defendant created or those created by another, or both.

Oregon § 164.381. Definitions

As used in Sections 137.131, 164.381 to 164.386, and 419C.461:

(1) "Graffiti" means any inscriptions, words, figures, or designs that are marked, etched, scratched, drawn, painted, pasted, or otherwise affixed to the surface of property.

(2) "Graffiti implement" means paint, ink, chalk, dye, or other substance or any instrument or article designed or adapted for spraying, marking, etching, scratching, or carving surfaces.

Oregon § 164.383. Unlawfully Applying Graffiti

(1) A person commits the offense of unlawfully applying graffiti if the person, having no right to do so nor reasonable ground to believe that the person has such right, intentionally damages property of another by applying graffiti to the property.

(2) Unlawfully applying graffiti is a Class A violation. Upon a conviction for unlawfully applying graffiti, a court, in addition to any fine it imposes and pursuant to Section 137.128 but notwithstanding Section 137.129, may order the defendant to perform up to 100 hours of community service. The community service must include removing graffiti, either those that the defendant created or those created by another, or both.

(3) If the court orders community service, the community service must be completed within six months after entry of the order unless the person shows good cause why community service cannot be completed within the six-month time period.

Oregon § 164.386. Unlawfully Possessing Graffiti Implement

(1) A person commits the offense of unlawfully possessing a graffiti implement if the person possesses a graffiti implement with the intent of using the graffiti implement in violation of Section 164.383.

(2) Unlawfully possessing a graffiti implement is a Class C violation. Upon a conviction for unlawfully possessing a graffiti implement, a court, in addition to any fine it imposes and pursuant to Section 137.128 but notwithstanding Section 137.129, may order the defendant to perform up to 50 hours of community service. The community service must include removing graffiti, either those that the defendant created or those created by another, or both.

(3) If the court orders community service, the community service must be completed within six months after entry of the order unless the person shows good cause why community service cannot be completed within the six-month time period.

Oregon § 164.388. Preemption

The provisions of Sections 137.131, 164.381 to 164.386, and 419C.461 are not intended to preempt any local regulation of graffiti or graffiti-related activities or any prosecution under Section 164.345, 164.354, or 164.365.

Oregon § 419C.461. Graffiti Offenses; Personal or Community Service; Liability for Damages

(1) When a youth offender has been found to be within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court for having committed an act that if committed by an adult would constitute a violation of Section 164.383 or 164.386 or criminal mischief and the act consisted of defacing property by creating graffiti, the court, in addition to any other disposition, may order the youth offender to perform:

(a) Personal service, as provided in Section 419C.465, consisting of removing graffiti; or

(b) If the victim does not agree to the personal service, community service consisting of removing graffiti at some location other than that defaced by the youth offender.

(2) In no case shall the youth offender, pursuant to this section, perform more hours of personal or community service than would be indicated by dividing the monetary damage caused by the youth offender by the legal minimum wage.

(3)(a) When a youth offender has been found to be within the jurisdiction of the juvenile court for having committed an act that if committed by an adult would constitute a violation of Section 164.383, the court may find the parent, legal guardian, or other person lawfully charged with the care or custody of the youth offender liable for actual damages to person or property caused by the youth offender. However, a parent who is not entitled to legal custody of the youth offender at the time of the act is not liable for the damages.

(b) The legal obligation of the parent, legal guardian, or other person under this subsection may not exceed the liability provided in Section 30.765.

(c) The court may, with the consent of the parent, legal guardian, or other person, order the parent, legal guardian, or other person to complete a parent effectiveness program approved by the court. Upon the parent's, legal guardian's, or other person's completion of the program to the satisfaction of the court, the court may dismiss any other penalties imposed upon the parent, legal guardian, or other person.


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